Adair, Lorna Jean (1931-2011)

September 06, 2012 − by LLC_Admin − in People of Mission − 1 Comments

Lorna Jean AdairLorna Jean Fearn was born in North Battleford, Saskatchewan; her father had immigrated from Scotland, and she had one sister. At the age of eight she moved with her parents to Vancouver, where she helped out in her father’s grocery store on Main Street. She attended Sir John Oliver High School, then nursing school at St. Paul’s Hospital, from where Lorna graduated as a Registered Nurse. She practiced nursing in Williams Lake, where she met Douglas Adair, who worked at the local bank.

The couple married in 1954 and moved to Mission the same year. In Mission, they raised four children, Bruce, Ian, David, and Robin as well two of Lorna’s cousins, Jim and Joan. An active community member, Lorna was Chair of Mission Parks and Recreation and Chair of the Mission Arts Council. Also an avid golfer, curler and bridge player, Lorna and Doug cultivated many friends and a variety of interests and activities. As Rotarians, the Adairs sponsored two exchange students from Denmark and Australia who lived with their family for a year at a time. Lorna and Doug remained close to their international families for many years after.

The Adairs were devout members of St. Andrew’s United Church, and embarked on overseas missions. From 1986 to 1989 Lorna and Doug lived and worked in a missionary hospital in Papua, New Guinea, becoming proficient in the local language and giving classes in nursing and general education. After returning to BC, Doug served two terms on Mission Council while Lorna devoted herself to many volunteer positions. She served on the board of Pleasant View Care Home and as a volunteer at the Mission Hospice as well as the Mennonite Central Committee Thrift store. In 1999, Lorna and Doug Adair were given the Freedom of the City for their lifelong contributions to Mission.

V. BACH

Source: Mission City Record, March 10, 2011





One Comment

  1. You can listen to Lorna’s comments on Local Politics in the 1970′s, Elections and Amalgamation in the Oral History Centre, Tape I-2

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